Saying g’day to the locals

Image c/ civilbeat.com
Image c/ civilbeat.com

I was walking to work today a bit after 8 on a clear bright morning, and up ahead near Government House noticed a group of Aboriginal people sitting on the path. I was very interested in analysing my own instinctive reactions and then my subsequent responses to those reactions.

My initial thought was to deviate from the path and pass them at some distance. Then I asked why I reacted that way. I wasn’t exactly sure.

  1. Maybe they’ll ask me for some money, and I’ll feel bad when I say no, so I’ll avoid the situation entirely. I don’t want to give them anything because I’m sure they’ll just blow it on booze.
  2. Maybe they’ll get violent towards me; but that’s never happened to me before when I’ve walked past similar groups, they’ve tended to just sit and mind their own business. The only times I’ve been asked for money is when people have been walking around on their own.

So I kept walking towards them, still with some reticence. Then I had another thought, one which has occurred to me more than once in the past but one I’d rarely done something about.

I’ll say hello.

So I bravely kept walking towards this group of fairly surly-looking people talking roughly to each other, and as I passed them on my left said “Morning”. Their faces brightened, they simultaneously raised their hands and waved and greeted me in return. As I walked on one of them called out asking for the time, which I provided, and I went on my way. Without molestation, foul language or being chased for a ‘cupla bucks for a sandwich’. Instead I felt a warm feeling inside that I’d made a small connection with a group of people who have much less than I do and who I’d rarely crossed paths with.

I wonder how many other people must walk past Aboriginals, homeless people, a group of skateboarding kids and similar groups and just ignore them because they have similar fears to mine? To them we probably look like a bunch of too-good snobs who can’t deign to look upon them, and maybe there’s an element of that for some. But I’m sure for others they share similar fears and just want to avoid the situation. Maybe some of these people aren’t chasing money or booze – maybe they’d just like someone show them enough respect to give them a few seconds of their day to acknowledge they exist and to feel like a human being again.

The Surface 3 has a Smart Cover – but only half the time

When I first got my HP Touchpad (vale webOS…) I thought nothing of opening the cover and pressing the Power button to turn on the screen. After all that’s what you always did. But one of the nice little features of device covers in the last four years has been the integration of magnets to activate a hidden power switch, so the screen is turned off automatically when you close the cover, and on when you open the cover back up. It’s become a normal part of interacting with a device for many of us, and I’ve enjoyed this feature on my Nexus 7, my LG G2 and most recently my Surface 2.

So imagine my surprise when I discovered my Surface 3 screen stayed off when I re-opened the cover! Really? Yep; the screen goes off when the cover is closed, but it stays off when the cover is opened.

Windows 8 power options
Windows 8 power options

There was nothing in the power options to change this, nor anything available online. Plenty about closing the lid, but not a cracker about what to do when opening it.

Yesterday’s attempt at Microsoft Support had all the usual suspects – updates, settings and even a full device refresh, all to no avail. Today’s attempt connected me with a different person who advertised this to me as a feature. Yes a feature people! Having the screen NOT turn on when you open the cover is a feature. Remember that. I have to keep reminding myself ‘cos for some reason I mistakenly keep thinking it’s a bug.

The support guy directed me to this Microsoft Community thread so it sounds like I’m not the only one asking this question. But surely if Microsoft want to install this bug / remove this feature they should give the user an option to turn it back on if they want? I’m still at a loss as the reason for making the cover smart enough to turn off the screen when it’s closed, but not smart enough to turn it back on when you open it. After all, when do you open the cover and NOT want to do something with the screen?

I’m waiting on a callback to advise if this can be changed. In the meantime if anyone has a registry hack for this I’m all ears!

 

EDIT: 15 Feb 2015: A subsequent tech told me they’d done this because some people had had the cover opening and closing in their bag and running the battery flat so this feature’s not available anymore. I’d rather have the option to make this decision myself but as at now this decision has been made for us. 🙁

Why I didn’t hate Windows RT

windows rt logo
Are you sad to see this go?

By now you’d all know that I’m onto a Surface 3 which naturally has full Windows 8. I’m sure this upgrade path is common for Windows RT users. But I’d like two minutes on the soapbox being (as it appears) a lone voice in support of the Windows RT project.

Windows RT was more than adequate for my needs while I had the Surface 2. I never expected it to be a full version of Windows and I didn’t need that; I needed a lightweight portable device with a browser and MS Office, and with the alternative being a heavier and pricier Surface 2 Pro, the Surface 2 with Windows RT was the best choice for me. I didn’t expect it to run desktop apps, because I knew it couldn’t. I didn’t expect 100% driver compatibility, because I knew Windows RT to Windows 7 was like iOS to OSX. Two different beasts for two different purposes.

Microsoft evidently wanted to make a device which could be competitive (on some levels) with the iPad, but back when they started this project (well before the release in 2012) low power x86 CPU’s like the Cherry Trail didn’t exist and weren’t even on the horizon. That this is correct is born out that the ‘right’ hardware didn’t come along until three years after the original device released. The x86 hardware available to Microsoft at the time meant a Surface Pro-like device with its weight, heat and battery drain, and no-one looking for an iPad was ever going to go for that. So their next best option was Windows RT, a stripped-down OS specifically designed for a range of CPU’s which DID have the low power architecture they wanted, i.e. the ARM range.

It’s easy to stand here in 2015 and lambast Microsoft for Windows RT, but at the time I think it was an entirely logical decision to write a version of Windows which gave people some of the features and interface they were used to in a low-power, slim package.

Would they do anything different in hindsight? No doubt; it’s been far from a blazing success and I’m sure they’ve learnt a few things in terms of timelining and marketing. But in 2012 I think Windows RT was the right decision. Equally I think its time is done now the hardware is at a stage where devices like the Surface 3 are possible.

Thanks for the work you did, Windows RT. You served a valuable purpose at the time, but I suspect you won’t be missed.

Am I jinxed?? Surface cover turns screen off but not back on

OK so you would have seen yesterday’s post where I finally moved on the Surface 2 with its screen issues and now have a shiny bright Surface 3.

Problem.

OK it’s nothing like before, but the issue I now have is that the screen turns off when I close the cover (as expected), but it stays off when the cover is opened! I Googled this and didn’t find any other people with this problem. I’ve done all the updates, restarted the machine a few times but to no avail. As we speak I’m with Microsoft support who were looking for HyperV in the Windows Features (it wasn’t there), they have run a sfc /scannow operation (which found nothing) and are now doing a device refresh.

I hope this doesn’t turn into another case of a changeover device. I’ve just installed a brand new screen protector! (Which BTW isn’t the problem because 1) it was working before and 2) it still registers when the cover is closed).

Have you experienced this? What did you do about it?

 

Hello Surface 3!

Microsoft Surface 3
Microsoft Surface 3 (copyright Microsoft)

The touch screen issue on the Surface 2 never properly went away. It would work for a while, then often after a restart it would stop working. About 50% of the time it would come back after the battery ran flat, so I got through the last ~6 months by keeping it powered up whenever the screen was working, and if it did go flat and the screen stopped responding to touch I’d let it go flat again and try again.

I had already recommended my brother to purchase a S3 which he did and he was very happy with it. So when it spent the last month with the screen stuck not working something had to happen. I got approval through work to upgrade to the Surface 3 so I utilised the extended warranty to get a refund rather than just change over to another S2 unit.

So I’ve now got a 64Gb Surface 3 with a grey Type Cover, Surface pen, video adapter and (aftermarket) screen protector. Time will tell how this one behaves!

How to teach disobedience

In last week’s post about our unplanned week at home, I promised I’d expand on an incident which occurred on Friday at a Hungry Jack’s restaurant.

playground
Where battles are won and lost…

For those who came in late, I had the kids to myself for a couple of days while my wife was interstate for a family funeral. We’d paid a visit to the hospital and, having stayed longer than we planned, found it was time to eat and we were still on our way home with no dinner started at home. On a whim I stopped at HJ’s to grab a bite and ate by the indoor playground.

A small four year old boy (we’ll call him Charlie) was near our table and was slightly interfering with our peace so his parents told him to move away. Charlie showed no signs of having heard, much less acting upon, his parents’ request, though he quickly bored with us and moved back to the playground on his own volition. Twice more his parents issued instructions while he was on the playground, both of which Charlie ignored to which his parents responded by doing precisely nothing.

Continue reading How to teach disobedience

How to live more thankfully

Steve Goodier’s posts are always thought-provoking. I got this one today…

A man lay in a hospital bed worried about whether he would live or die. He called his pastor to come pray for him. He told her that if he got well, he’d donate $20,000 to the church.

The pastor prayed and the man eventually DID get well and returned home. But no check came to the church. The pastor paid him a visit.

Continue reading How to live more thankfully

When gastro serves you a lemon…. how to use a sudden week at home

jug of lemonade
When life serves you a lemon…

For months we’ve been looking forward to Family Camp. It’s a week-long camp with other Christadelphians for parents with young children, and it’s all about helping each other raise children who learn respect, care for others and above all, love God. We’ve been twice before and loved it, so booked into this one as soon as we could.

Continue reading When gastro serves you a lemon…. how to use a sudden week at home

Consequences

Why do we discipline children? While there may be many reasons, ultimately I believe:

We discipline to teach children there are consequences to their actions.

We know instinctively that everything we do has some consequence, even at the simplest levels. If we turn on a tap over an empty glass, the consequence is the glass is filled with water. If we push a tall box, the consequence is that the box falls and possibly causes something to break. As adults we know that we are responsible for dealing with the consequences of our actions, but that’s not something children understand. As very young children we’ve done everything for them, so they see us clean up their mess at the table and put them to bed when they’re tired. They can’t take responsibility for their actions when they’re very young, but as adults they will do this almost 100% of the time. So between infancy and adulthood they need to progressively learn this.

Continue reading Consequences